Back in October, we let you all know that our keeper team made the difficult decision to hand rear an African penguin after they had seen signs of illness and lack of appetite. A few months on, we are very happy to say that this young female penguin is doing very well. She has moved back onto the beach with around 70 other African and macaroni penguins, but the hard work doesn’t end there.

The decision to hand rear is never taken lightly as it inevitably has implications. As a result, the penguin is very comfortable and confident around people so we are now working hard with our Education and Keeping teams to encourage this penguin to be a penguin. This is an emotionally challenging task, having cared for her so closely from so early on, that requires perseverance and help from all of our Living Coasts team and our guests. As with all of our penguins, we ask people not to get too close or to touch them.

Previous hand reared chicks have always integrated back into the flock, but if you would like to check how she is doing, just ask one of our Penguin Patrol staff on your next visit to Living Coasts.

You can follow her progress so far by reading the initial press release here https://www.livingcoasts.org.uk/explore/news/detail/fish-and-chicks-at-living-coasts and our blog update here https://www.livingcoasts.org.uk/explore/blog/detail/how-to-make-friends-and-influence-penguins

Thank you in advance for your understanding - hopefully we can help this penguin fully integrate with the other penguins on the beach, so that in the future, she will pair up and have chicks of her own.


If you would like to get up close to our marine animals, why not book an experience that will take you behind the scenes? You can view our range of experiences on our website here; https://www.livingcoasts.org.uk/support-us/gifts-experiences
 

 

Quotes There is more to this than you think! Lots of sea life. Lots of penguins, seals, otters and more. Well… Quotes